Why Athletes Hide Concussion Symptoms

Whether or not an NCAA Division I athlete is likely to report concussion symptoms depends on factors including their vested interests, their understanding of health implications, and their team culture and societal influences drawn from narratives of performance circulating in media, according to a study published May 8, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE… Continue reading Why Athletes Hide Concussion Symptoms

Obesity Connected to Differences in Brain Form and Structure

Researchers using sophisticated MRI technology have found that higher levels of body fat are associated with differences in the brain’s form and structure, including smaller volumes of gray matter, according to a study published in the journal Radiology. The findings add important information to our understanding of the connection between obesity and negative health consequences… Continue reading Obesity Connected to Differences in Brain Form and Structure

Simple Test Predicts Prolonged Symptoms of Pediatric Sports Concussions: Study

Researchers from Children’s Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado, have found that abnormal performance on the Romberg balance test can indicate that children and adolescents will experience prolonged symptoms following sports-related concussion. This finding is reported today in a new article by David R. Howell, PhD, and colleagues… Continue reading Simple Test Predicts Prolonged Symptoms of Pediatric Sports Concussions: Study

Your Brain and Memory May be Impacted by What You Eat: Study

You may be familiar with the saying, “You are what you eat,” but did you know the food you eat could impact your memory? High levels of a satiety hormone could decrease a person’s likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s disease. For individuals who have higher levels of the hormone, their chance of having mild cognitive impairment… Continue reading Your Brain and Memory May be Impacted by What You Eat: Study

The Brain and Imagination: Close Enough to Reality – Study

New brain imaging research shows that imagining a threat lights up similar regions as experiencing it does. It suggests imagination can be a powerful tool in overcoming phobias or post traumatic stress. Imagine a barking dog, a furry spider or another perceived threat and your brain and body respond much like they would if you… Continue reading The Brain and Imagination: Close Enough to Reality – Study

Youth Football, Concussions and Brain Injury – The Real Danger

Every autumn weekend in the US, thousands of youngsters as young as 5 years old strap on their pads, lace up their cleats and get after each other on the football field. However, fewer and fewer of them are playing tackle football. Parents are concerned about concussions, brain injuries and brain damage. Proponents of the… Continue reading Youth Football, Concussions and Brain Injury – The Real Danger

Youth Concussion Recommendations Updated

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated its concussion recommendations to support children and teens engaging in light physical activity and returning to school as they recover. The report, revised for the first time in eight years, also advises against complete removal of electronic devices, such as television, computers and smartphones, following a concussion.… Continue reading Youth Concussion Recommendations Updated