Early Sport-Specialization Leads to Higher Injury Risk

Not long ago, the National Federation of High School Associations (NFHS) undertook a study to determine the impact of early-sport specialization on injury rates among high school athletes. While there are a few minor flaws in the study, which I’ll address momentarily, the study sheds a fairly strong negative light on early sport-specialization as it… Continue reading Early Sport-Specialization Leads to Higher Injury Risk

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Strongman Spatial Tire Flip Challenge

An “upgrade” to what we’re calling the “Strongman Spatial Challenge.” An 8 yard square, 3 foam rollers and 3 cones as obstacles. The rules: 1. Hit an obstacle, do 10 Rope Slams. 2. Flip the tire outside the square, do 10 Rope Slams. 3. On the last flip, the tire has to be back on… Continue reading Strongman Spatial Tire Flip Challenge

“Bulletproof” your knees, part 1

Want “bullet-proof” knees? Learn to manage frontal plane forces (yes, transverse plane, too, but I’m talking frontal plane here.) Here, Cam is working on Band-resisted Shuffles with controlled return steps, which allow her to develop frontal plane stabilization strength by managing a frontal plane load on a single leg. It works well for her because… Continue reading “Bulletproof” your knees, part 1

Sensory Issues for ASD and Neurotypical Athletes

It’s remarkable what I learn from my athletes. With my ASD (Autism Spectrum) athletes, there is so much to learn about movement ability and deficiencies, specific programming needs and variables and the unique communication styles each one thrives on. In other words, they have the same overall programming and training needs as neurotypical athletes. Only… Continue reading Sensory Issues for ASD and Neurotypical Athletes

What is Core Training? (Part 1)

Core training. What is it, really? Is it “crushing”the abs? “Blasting” the glutes? Both at the same time? (yikes!) At its most essential, effective core training should begin with an assessment of alignment. Is the thoracic spine, rib cage and thoraco-lumbar canister aligned? If not, we must begin with low-level, simple neuro-muscular strategies to help… Continue reading What is Core Training? (Part 1)

Kettlebells – Ready to Swing?

A kettlebell. Present in so many fitness centers, gyms and studios that it’s becoming rarer NOT to see them. So many great exercises and activities to be done with them. A near universal favorite? The kettlebell swing. But are your clients “ready to swing?” The answer? “It depends.” Issues of hip and ankle mobility, glute… Continue reading Kettlebells – Ready to Swing?

Skill-based Conditioning for Sports

Coaches…when programming activities for conditioning, why not use activities that build desired skills, create effective athletic conditioning AND have a “fun factor?” This competitive relay incorporates linear speed, reactive/plyometric training, footwork and change of direction. And…it’s FUN! Teams compete to complete the course the most times in a given time frame. Quality of completion is… Continue reading Skill-based Conditioning for Sports

Core Strength, Control or Activation?

Those in the fitness profession place a heavy focus on the idea of core “strength.” Mind you, I realize that we benefit our clients by helping them develop strength through the lumbo-pelvic hip complex, thoraco-pelvic canister and spinal stabilization system. However, strength is useless if you have an inadequate degree of “activation” of that strength,… Continue reading Core Strength, Control or Activation?

Roll Pattern Hip Assessment and Activation

The brain trains movements, not muscles. Understand this bio-mechanical, neuro-muscular reality and you can find a much smoother pathway to correcting muscular, movement pattern and kinetic chain dysfunction. Andrew exhibits slight asymmetry in lunging, 1/2 kneeling and rhythmic activities like skipping, jogging/backpedal and shuffling. Hip flexion/extension exhibits incompletely on one side vs the other. Should… Continue reading Roll Pattern Hip Assessment and Activation

What we can learn from Lee’s Knees.

  This is Lee. Well, actually, it’s Lee’s knees. In his right knee he’s missing a meniscus since 1981 and ruptured his Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL,) and tore his Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL), sometime between 1981 and 5 years ago. His orthopedic surgeon elected not to repair, telling him “I’ll see you in about 10… Continue reading What we can learn from Lee’s Knees.